Tag: Raspberry Pi

Howto fix: InRelease’ changed its ‘Suite’ value from ‘testing’ to ‘stable’ “error”

Well, its not really an error..

So: YAY!!! We are going from testing to stable on the raspberry pi (debian buster).
What now?

Run it like this:

Your will see something like this:

And ofcourse dont forget to upgrade!

Fix that cheap wifi dongle (linux)

Cheap wifi dongles on the raspberry pi (v1 b). Don’t you love the frustrations they bring.

So you buy a cheap wifi dongle but it just wont do what a more expensive brand would: run without problems.

First, do what all the people out there on your search quest do. Sudo here, enter there, dont forget the raspi-config command. Many way’s to Rome.

These are my little notes (so I wont forget) that worked for me.

Now try to get to your wifi and press the -> arrow.
fiddle arround (shout some more) enter ip adresses if you like. And somehow this could work.

But darn, there we have it. Now it goes into sleep mode. So we need to keep it alive.

Oke, lets do it the dirty way.

Keep the ping on!

Make a cronjob:

And we are good to go?

Watch the sky (simple python ftp script)

So you got the raspberry and the camera board.

With a cronjob you can let it take pictures every few seconds or hour and do something with it. Might be  a timelaps video or send it to twitter. In this case I added a simple script to the “RasBotPi” so it can send a picture every hour to this website.

2013-11-14 11.24.55

The “RasBotPi”

a Simple script will capture a jpg and then send it to this website with python and its ftp library.

Here an example of the snapshot that the camera board takes..

Some clouds..

Some clouds..

 

Timelaps with the Raspberry Pi camera board

source:
http://www.raspberrypi-spy.co.uk/2013/05/creating-timelapse-videos-with-the-raspberry-pi-camera/

Step 1 – Taking the time-lapsed photos

This command will take a photo every 60 seconds (60000 milliseconds) for 2 hours (7200000 milliseconds) resulting in a sequence of 120 images.

The “%04d” will result in a four digit number appearing in each filename.

myimage_0001.jpg
myimage_0002.jpg

myimage_0119.jpg
myimage_0120.jpg

Step 2 – Combine images into MP4 video

Once you’ve got your image sequence you will need a method to stitch them together. I decided to use “avconv”. You can install this useful library with the following command :

To construct the video file from your image sequence you use the command shown below. Although it appears on multiple lines for readability it should be entered as a single line on the command line :

The video will be the full resolution of the default image size (2592×1944).

To crop the images and create a more standard 1280×720 resolution video you can use the following command :

The “vf” option defines a video filter. In this case two filters which crop the incoming image to 2592×1458 and then scale them to 1280×720.

The “r” option tells avconv to create a video with a frames per second of 10. It appears twice to prevent avconv dropping frames that it thinks are similar.

The “crf” option tells avconv to aim for a quality level of “20″ which is a good starting point. Lowers values are better but will increase the file size.

The “-g” option sets the GOP value. The YouTube Advanced Encoding Settings page recommends that the GOP should be set to half the frame rate so this is set to 15.

Gertboard ATmega IO vs. Arduino Pins

The printing on the Gertboard indicated the port and pin numbers internal to the Atmega microcontroller…

However this is normally hidden from the user by the Arduino’s “wiring” library and rather than refer to (e.g.) Port B, bit 5, you’d normally refer to “pin 15″.

The mapping is fairly straightforward, but to help you connect wires to pins on the Gertboard, here is a handy table to let you see what the connections are:

See source:
https://projects.drogon.net/raspberry-pi/gertboard/gertboard-atmega-io-vs-arduino-pins/

Gertboard